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Finola Kennedy

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  • Brian Lenihan (1959-2011): A Note

    Finola Kennedy

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    It is just over ten years since the then Irish Minister of Finance, Brian Lenihan Jnr, died on 10 June 2011, at the early age of fifty-two. He belonged to a gifted, politically engaged family.

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  • Building the Archive of Stigmatic Women Religious

    Kristof Smeyers

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    Kristof Smeyers

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  • Calvinists and Lutherans: Contesting the European Reformation

    Graeme Murdock

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    Calvinists and Lutherans: Contesting the European Reformation

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  • Cardinal Owen McCann, Angola and Mozambique: Greater Ireland Meets Greater Portugal

    Alexandra Maclennan

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    The first Mass in Southern Africa was celebrated by the Portuguese at Algoa Bay near Port Elizabeth, shortly after they arrived with Bartholomeu Dias in 1487. That there was a Catholic faith for the Dutch settlers to outlaw when they arrived in the Cape Peninsula in 1652 is indicative of its survival long after the Portuguese had left at the turn of the sixteenth century, and that in spite of the lack of continuity of pastoral presence and access to the sacraments. And again, in the nineteenth century, when the Irish but Lisbon-educated Dominican Patrick Griffith was sent to the Cape Colony to become the first Irish vicar apostolic in Southern Africa in 1838, and he set out to travel the length and breadth of the territory, and he found scattered Catholic families across the territory.

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  • Careful Thought Needed on Border Polls

    John Bruton

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    The history of Northern Ireland since 1920 demonstrates the danger of attempting to impose, by a simple majority, a constitutional settlement and an identity on a minority, who feel they have been overruled. Those pressing for an early border poll on Irish unity, which would have to take place in both parts of Ireland, should reflect on this. Such a poll could repeat the error of 1920 and add to divisions, rather than diminish them.

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  • Catholic Education – the International Context

    Paul Meany

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    The Irish education system, like others around the world, has evolved from a combination of religious, political, philosophical and economic factors.

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  • Catholic Reform in Ireland in a European Context

    Tadhg Ó hAnnracháin

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    Catholic Reform in Ireland in a European Context

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  • Catholic Schools in Ireland Today – a Changing Sector in a Time of Change

    Marie Griffin

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    There is a popular narrative that sees Catholic education resting on the vestiges of a former hegemony, defending itself against all-comers and employing a siege mentality, resistant to change and totally out of line with the zeitgeist of a modern, pluralist Ireland.

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  • Catholic Social Teaching and Freedom of Association in Ireland

    Gerry Whyte

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    In this paper, I wish to review the legal position of trade unions and their members under the Irish Constitution in light of Catholic Social Teaching on what the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church (hereafter ‘the Compendium’) refers to as ‘the ever urgent worker question,

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  • Catholic Social Teaching and the Gig Economy: Engaging Labour Law and the Desert Fathers

    Cathleen Kaveny

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    Catholic Social Teaching has not only consistently emphasised the dignity of work, it has also tirelessly defended the intrinsic value of the worker. In Rerum novarum (1891), Pope Leo XIII admonished wealthy owners and employers ‘not to look upon their work people as their bondsmen, but to respect in every man his dignity as a person ennobled by Christian character’.

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  • Catholicism in Modern Ireland – Ellen Coyne’s Are You There, God? It’s Me, Ellen

    Greg Daly

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    Few phrases from the Second Vatican Council fall more readily from the lips of those familiar with it than ‘signs of the times’. Christmas 1961 saw its first use in a conciliar context, when in his message convening the Council the following year, Pope St John XXIII reminded people that Christ has not left the world he redeemed, and recommended ‘that one should know how to distinguish the signs of the times’.1

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  • Christian Democracy and the Birth of the European Union

    Bryan Fanning

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    In the aftermath of the Second World War Christian Democracy quickly became a prominent political force in several European countries, though not in Scandinavia or Great Britain.

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