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Una Agnew

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  • From Shancoduff to Mossbawn: Lines of Convergence and Divergence in Kavanagh and Heaney

    Una Agnew

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    Una Agnew

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  • Full Issue: Democracy In Peril?

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  • Full Issue: Reformation 500

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  • Gay Byrne: The ‘Conservative Catholic’ Who Changed Ireland

    Mary Kenny

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    When Parnell died, he was described as ‘the uncrowned King of Ireland’. Something similar might be said – was said – about the broadcaster Gay Byrne, when he died in November 2019, aged eighty-five. Gay (‘Gaybo’ as he was popularly known) was not only the most famous television and radio presence in Ireland. At his death, tributes poured in from all sides emphasising the width of his impact on Irish society.

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  • George Goldie: A Catholic Architect in Post-Famine Ireland

    Caoimhín de Bhailís

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    The nineteenth-century saw the Catholic Church in Ireland express its newfound status after Emancipation in an expansive church building programme. Figures upward of two thousand have been given for the number of Roman Catholic churches either reconstructed or newly built between 1800 and 1870.

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  • Gnostic Undercurrents in Our Avatar Culture

    Fiachra Long

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    We are sometimes attracted by a striking, colourful and convenient initiative, but like the apparent bargain that flatters to deceive, or the colourful mushroom that turns out to be poisonous, some level of discretion is advised. The emergence of ChatGPT as the lead Artificial Intelligence platform is striking, colourful and convenient, but a high level of discretion is urgently advised.

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  • Going Deep, Going Forth, Going Together’, Part II- Seeking Meaning in a Transformed World

    Brendan Leahy

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    In the first part of this article,1 I looked at the reception of the Second Vatican Council’s teachings, indicating briefly how Pope Francis’s papacy is marking a phase in that reception. I want now to offer a reflection on how three of the social and cultural developments in Ireland of the past decades, when read in the light of Vatican II as reflected in Pope Francis’s teaching and actions, indicate directions for our deeper reception of the Council in Ireland.

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  • Heaney’s The Cure at Troy and the Christian Virtue of Hope

    Paul Corcoran

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    The penultimate chorus of Seamus Heaney’s Cure at Troy contains perhaps the poet’s most oft-quoted words. They cap the tone of a work that ‘proceeds from, and ends in, optimism’

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  • Heroes and Villains: A Historian’s Check-List

    Felix M Larkin

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    Historians like me are trained to think about significant figures from the past not as heroes or villains, but in a more nuanced way.

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  • Hitler Looks West- An Irish Diplomat’s Unwitting Role in the Plan to Alter Irish Neutrality

    Barry Whelan

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    On 24 August 1942 Ireland’s diplomatic representative to Spain, Leopold Kerney, met a senior figure in the SS (Schutzstaffel), Dr Edmund Veesenmayer, in a Madrid Café. The German had travelled under false papers on a special mission approved by the Reich Foreign Minister, Joachim von Ribbentropp, to sound Kerney out on Ireland’s willingness to to alter its neutral policy in the war.

     

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  • Home Truths: Irish Neoliberalism’s Eclipse of Irish Catholicism

    Kevin Hargaden

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    At one stage in Derek Scally’s brilliant journalistic account of the collapse of the influence of the Irish Catholic Church, he compares the institution to the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Thinking about the Irish Catholic Church as a ‘leaning tower of piety’ is an interesting image, because it is widely understood today that the famous white marble bell tower does not simply have a precipitous tilt because of faulty foundations.

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  • Homelessness: Some Theological Reflections

    Suzanne Mulligan

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    During my time in America, I was invited to spend a week at another very well-known Catholic university. It too proved to be a very fruitful visit; the generosity of the staff and the welcome I received was amazing. But in truth, I felt a little uncomfortable with the opulence that I saw around me. I met with one professor who works closely with the homeless community in the locality. She divided her time between her academic responsibilities at the university and running a homeless shelter. On the Wednesday evening she took me to the shelter and located in the upper room of the building was a small, simple chapel. That evening, along with about twenty homeless folks, we celebrated the Eucharist.

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