2020: Volume 109

Showing 1–12 of 33 results

David Clare

Contents

  • ‘I Feel Bould at All Times’: Irishness in Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s St Patrick’s Day and Pizarro

    David Clare

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    Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s most perceptive biographers have observed that, although Sheridan left his native Ireland shortly before his eighth birthday, never to return, he remained conscious and proud of his Irishness ‘to a degree that [was] … utterly baffling even to some of those closest to him’ for the rest of his life.

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  • ‘Ireland is the True Subject for the Irish’: Yeats’s Early Nationalist Overstatement

    Dylan Thursfield

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    Yeats’ declaration that ‘Ireland is the true subject for the Irish’ is extremely bold, limiting ‘Irish’ literature to an almost singular concern. But what does Yeats mean by this alarming statement? – and does it stand up to scrutiny?

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  • ‘The English Language Belongs to Us?’

    Brian Cosgrove

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    It was hardly headline-grabbing news, but some of us found a certain interest in the report, late in 2019, that the society or group dedicated to preserving the apostrophe had decided to abandon their efforts.

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  • 1916: The Honour and the Folly

    Edmond Grace SJ

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    In Ken Burns’s recent documentary series The Vietnam War, one of the interviewees, John Musgrave, describes the first time he saw the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC.

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  • A Changed Approach to Diplomacy: The Department of Foreign Affairs Then and Now

    Gearóid Ó Clérigh

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    The Department of Foreign Affairs, headquartered in Dublin, has improved in recent decades beyond all telling, since – if not due to – my retirement on Christmas Eve, 1995.

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  • Autumn 2020: Transformations

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  • George Goldie: A Catholic Architect in Post-Famine Ireland

    Caoimhín de Bhailís

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    The nineteenth-century saw the Catholic Church in Ireland express its newfound status after Emancipation in an expansive church building programme. Figures upward of two thousand have been given for the number of Roman Catholic churches either reconstructed or newly built between 1800 and 1870.

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  • Heaney’s The Cure at Troy and the Christian Virtue of Hope

    Paul Corcoran

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    The penultimate chorus of Seamus Heaney’s Cure at Troy contains perhaps the poet’s most oft-quoted words. They cap the tone of a work that ‘proceeds from, and ends in, optimism’

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  • Heroes and Villains: A Historian’s Check-List

    Felix M Larkin

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    Historians like me are trained to think about significant figures from the past not as heroes or villains, but in a more nuanced way.

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  • Hopkins and Lanier: A Transatlantic Note

    Gerald Roberts

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    At the time in April 1884 when he became (briefly) acquainted with the name of the American poet Sidney Lanier some three years after the latter’s death, Gerard Manley Hopkins’s knowledge of his transatlantic contemporaries was certainly very limited.

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  • Ireland’s Election 2020: The Shape of Things to Come?

    Anthony White

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    There were a number of unique factors about the Irish general election of February 2020, which in time may cause it to be seen as one of the most significant in the history of the state.

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  • John Henry Newman and the Idea of a University

    David Begg

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    In an address to the Pontifical Irish College in Rome on 11 October 2019 to mark the canonisation of John Henry Newman, Archbishop Diarmuid Martin observed: ‘The development of university education in Ireland has lost this dream of Newman. The main universities proclaim themselves to be, by definition, exclusively secular and thus they shun any real place for religion in their culture’.

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