2019: Volume 108

Showing 1–12 of 32 results

Andrew McMahon

Contents

  • ‘New’ Ireland and Pope Francis

    Andrew McMahon

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    ‘While Pope Francis expressed contrition for the crimes committed by the

    clergy, the consensus is that he did not go far enough in terms of outlining the

    steps he intends to take to ensure that abuse is eradicated from the church’.

    These words were central to an editorial which appeared in the Irish edition

    of The Sunday Times on Sunday, 2 September.

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  • A Locus of Dialogue: the Catholic School in a Pluralist World

    Brian Flannery

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    It is generally accepted that the levels of Catholic patronage in Irish education are out of kilter with the profile of Ireland’s new demographic.

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  • A Pope on a Neoliberal Island

    Kevin Hargaden

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    It is a year since Pope Francis visited Ireland. Various explanations can be offered for the relatively small numbers who attended the official ceremonies, although it should be remembered that these events represented the largest public gatherings anywhere in the state last year.

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  • After the Pope – the Catholic Church in Ireland

    Gerry O’Hanlon SJ

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    The role of the Catholic Church in Irish public and private life has changed considerably.

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  • After the Visit: Re-Learning Our Past

    Stephen Collins

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    There is a general consensus that the visit of Pope Francis to Ireland last summer failed to make any serious impact on the country.

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  • An Abrahamic Journey: Ireland, Faith and the Papal Visit

    Michael Kirwan SJ

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    A year after the visit of Pope Francis to the World Meeting of Families in August 2018, it would be stretching things to describe Ireland as ‘transformed’.

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  • Another Beginning?

    Brendan Hoban

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    The thrust of this article is three-fold. One, ongoing change is now a permanent reality for the Catholic Church. A first step is to accept this reality. Two, dealing with change means ‘living in the grey’, that’s accepting and embracing difficult questions that have no ready-made ‘black and white’ answers.

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  • Are You Serious? Facing the Challenges

    Bobby McDonagh

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    Like many others who attended Gonzaga College, one of my great privileges was to know and to be taught by Fr Joe Veale SJ.

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  • Catholic Education – the International Context

    Paul Meany

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    The Irish education system, like others around the world, has evolved from a combination of religious, political, philosophical and economic factors.

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  • Catholic Schools in Ireland Today – a Changing Sector in a Time of Change

    Marie Griffin

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    There is a popular narrative that sees Catholic education resting on the vestiges of a former hegemony, defending itself against all-comers and employing a siege mentality, resistant to change and totally out of line with the zeitgeist of a modern, pluralist Ireland.

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  • Catholic Social Teaching and Freedom of Association in Ireland

    Gerry Whyte

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    In this paper, I wish to review the legal position of trade unions and their members under the Irish Constitution in light of Catholic Social Teaching on what the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church (hereafter ‘the Compendium’) refers to as ‘the ever urgent worker question,

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  • Catholic Social Teaching and the Gig Economy: Engaging Labour Law and the Desert Fathers

    Cathleen Kaveny

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    Catholic Social Teaching has not only consistently emphasised the dignity of work, it has also tirelessly defended the intrinsic value of the worker. In Rerum novarum (1891), Pope Leo XIII admonished wealthy owners and employers ‘not to look upon their work people as their bondsmen, but to respect in every man his dignity as a person ennobled by Christian character’.

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